Accessibility

Use clear and simple language

Complex language can be difficult to understand if users have cognitive disabilities.

To clarify and simplify language:

  • Use words that an eighth grader can understand. For example, use create instead of generate.
  • Avoid metaphors and figures of speech.
  • Keep sentences short — no more than 10-15 words.
  • Keep paragraphs short — no more than three sentences each.
  • Use subheadings and unordered or ordered lists when appropriate to make content more scannable.
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Requirements

Use descriptive labels for interactive elements

Labels for interactive components such as buttons, links, and inputs should make the purpose, action, or destination of the component clear. Using phrases like click here or learn more don’t explain what will happen when the component is interacted with.

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Requirements

Provide alternative text for images and other non-text content

All content on a page should be presented in text or with a text equivalent. For example, meaningful images and icons need to have alt text so that users relying on screen readers can understand the page content without missing any of the context.

When writing alt text consider the visuals' purpose on the page:

  1. Describing decorative images: For visuals that are not actionable, such as logos and decorative images, describe the meaning of the image.
  2. Describing non-decorative images: For visuals that are providing information, like charts, describe what the visual depicts and the relationships and outcomes of the data points.
  3. Describing the purpose: Visuals such as icons or icon buttons have a purpose or action. Describe action to explain the control.
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Requirements